The Big Debate: In-person or Electronic Voting


In the most recent election, voter turnout was at an all-time low, and this year’s presidential election is estimated to have an even lower turnout. Older generations do not understand why younger people are not showing up at the polls, but younger people understand the reason perfectly. As voter turnout continues to decrease, a lot of people are debating whether or not we should use in person or electronic voting. In person voting caters to the needs of the older generations while electronic or online voting caters to the needs of younger generations. Is one form better than the other or is it just a preference?

Why younger generations support electronic voting
Younger people are used to having everything at their fingertips or in their pockets. We are used to having a smartphone in our hands so we can look up what happened last night, what events our friends are going to this weekend, the products we need to buy in 2016, and how our stocks are doing. It has gotten so bad that Millennials and younger generations feel like they are missing something when they are not in contact with their phones. Whether having all of this information right at our fingertips is good or bad is another argument, but I bring this up because having everything right there for us on our phones is a large part of the reason why going to the polls to vote seems like such a hassle. Younger generations argue that people should be able to vote online, and having a online voting systems will increase the number of millennials who choose to vote.

Why older generations support in-person voting

Older people support voting in person for two main reasons. First, it is traditional. Older generations appreciate the tradition of going to the polls on election day to cast their vote for their favored candidate. Second, in person voting makes voting accessible to everyone. Aside from those who cannot afford internet access, computers, and smartphones, there are people out there who are computer illiterate. Seniors make up a large portion of the computer illiterate population, and there is no reason for them to learn how to use these devices. Because of this, if voting were decided to be online rather than in person, a large part of the population would be unable to vote. That does not sound very fair.

Let us choose a happy medium
With older generations wanting to vote in person and younger generations wanting to vote online, why don’t we allow people to choose between in-person and electronic voting? It might make things a little more complicated to make room for both of these types of voting systems, but to increase our voter turnout for important elections, we must cater to the needs of every citizen.